Day Tripping - DC Metro
Anne Arundel County, Maryland
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ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
2011 House and Garden Pilgramage
SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011
10 am to 5 pm
NOTE TO DayTripping Metro SITEVISITORS: This is the first time we have included a survey of our entire journey on a house and garden tour. In 2008, however, we did add some photos (mostly flower images) of the Chestertown, Maryland, tour. We have enjoyed numerous tours over the years in both Maryland and Virginia, but this one stands out as one of the premier tours we have ever taken.

When we first received our copy of the Maryland House and Garden Pilgramage 2011 Tours booklet, we read the descriptions of the six tours and couldn't make up our minds on which to select. You must understand that we want to see all the historic sites in Maryland but can't always fit the many tours into a schedule - sometines weather interferes.

At any rate, when we took a second look, the Anne Arundel tour stood out for several reasons. First, we are not familiar with large sections of this county. Secondly, this tour takes us to one of our favorite garden centers, Homestead Gardens, and we just couldn't resist that opportunity. And third, and most significantly, there were three seventeenth and one eighteenth-century homes included. We were hooked and experienced one of the finest tours we have ever taken.

We must also mention that the Pilgramage web site and tour book (great tour descriptions and directions) are superb and the assistance we received when calling regarding tickets was so very, very courteous and helpful. This was an auspicious beginning to a great day in Maryland and Anne Arundel County.

Logo Courtesy Maryland House and Garden Pilgramage Web Site

The 2011 Pilgrimage South County Tour focused on that portion of Anne Arundel County known as South County. It is the last remaining area of large farms in the county.

Anne Arundel, established in 1650, is the third oldest county in Maryland, following St. Mary's and Kent Counties.


The county was named in honor of Lady Anne Arundel, wife of Cecil Calvert, second Lord Baltimore and Proprietor of the Province, who died in 1649.

The county was laid out in "hundreds" which gave way to "parishes" with the establishment of the Church of England in the Province of Maryland in 1692.

The Quakers were instrumental in the settling of the southern part of the county.

Many of the homes on the tour either have never been on the Pilgrimage or have not been open for many years.

This tour was unique in that there is a working winery and an active archaeological site on tour.


Above Historical Text from the Historic Londontown Web Site
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Our Comments: Obligation, Sudley, and Holly Hill all date to the seventeenth century in origin and maintain many features of that long ago time. Each one is situated in a wonderful setting giving views to the countryside, grounds, and gardens. Obligation has been adapted for modern living, whereas the original rooms of Sudley have been authentically restored and painted in authentic color schemes.




Towering majestically above the steep banks of the South River, the William Brown House, a handsome brick building (see photo above), is the only remaining structure in the once-thriving tobacco port of London, declared a port of entry in 1683.


William Brown House as an Almshouse
(Photo Courtesy Historic Londontown Web Site)

In the midst of London Town's decline, William Brown built an imposing Georgian structure which still stands overlooking the South River.

Built between 1758 and 1764, it is one of two buildings that survive from colonial London Town. Brown, an aspiring gentleman who operated both a ferry and an inn at London Town, was also a joiner and a cabinetmaker. He probably served as his own "undertaker," or building contractor, as he did for the construction of the Upton Scott House in Annapolis.

The two houses, both completed in 1764, bear a striking resemblance to each other.


In 1828 the Brown House and 10 acres were acquired by Anne Arundel County for use as an Almshouse. It continued operation as the "poor house" until passage of the Welfare Act in 1965. In the 1970s, it became part of the Anne Arundel County parks system.

Above Historical Text from the Historic Londontown Web Site
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Our Comments:We did not visit Historic London Town on this tour since we had visited this great museum and house before.

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This house is one of the finest examples of domestic high-style Gothic Revival architecture in Maryland. Constructed in the 1850s for Thomas Sellman Iglehart, Jr. (1820-1904), this picturesque country villa was patterned after the designs and plans published by Architects Andrew Jackson Davis and Andrew Jackson Downing in the mid-19th century.

Indian Range embodies the distinctive features of this architectural style - the steeply pitched multi-gabled roof, tall chamfered brick chimneys, casement windows, board-and-batten siding, and a broad veranda.

The interior retains much of its original decorative details, including highly ornate stairs, plaster cornice moldings, ceiling medallions and marble mantels.

The rear wing originally functioned as the carriage house and kitchen with servants' quarters located in the loft space. The property retains evidence of Victorian garden terracing.

Indian Range
Indian Range
(Photo by Ron Patterson)

Indian Range has been beautifully restored by the present owners.

Above Text from Maryland House and Garden Pilgramage 2011 Tours Web Site
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Chickens at Indian Range - Photos by Ron Patterson


Our Comments: Indian Range offers artistic Victorian interiors featuring a wonderful variety of collections, furniture and art. The exterior of this Gothic house is picturesque and the grounds exquisite, featuring many roses and even some wandering chickens! Just a delight. It is, indeed, the when-can-I-bring-the-clothes-and-move-in kind of house.

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The land on which this late 17th century house stands was granted in 1671 by Charles Calvert to Thomas Stockett who emigrated to Maryland in 1658.

Named “The Obligation” in the 1671 document, the name may refer to repayment for the loss of the Stockett family property in Kent, England. This royalist family supported Charles II during his exile during the Cromwell era in England.

Obligation
Obligation
(Photo by Ron Patterson)

The property remained in the Stockett family for more than 275 years and was purchased by the current owner’s family in 1946, thus being only the second family to own the property in its 335-year history.

The house was originally one and a half stories with four chimneys. It was later raised to three stories and the chimneys brought together. All interior walls are brick with plaster applied directly to the brick.

There is a unique wooden lock on the south door, a 17th century box -type stairway, and an unusual corner fireplace. Electricity, indoor plumbing, and central heating were added to the house in 1948.


All rooms, including the bedrooms, have a fireplace. The furnishings include many family heirlooms.

Above Text from Maryland House and Garden Pilgramage 2011 Tours Web Site
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This 58-acre farm, vineyard, and winery was once part of a 332-acre property called Richland.

Built in 1893 by gentleman farmer Robert Murray Cheston and his wife, the former Mary Murray, the elegant rural dwelling is an excellent example of a blend of Colonial Revival and Queen Ann architectural styles.

The house was designed by renowned architect William C. Noland, founder of the Virginia architectural firm of Noland and de Saussure.

In 1954, the Cheston family sold 58 acres of Richland to architect Francis Taliaferro, one of the founders of RTKL of Maryland. The Taliaferros gave the property its present name.

Photo Courtesy Thanksgiving Farm Web Site
Thanksgiving Farmhouse
(Photo Courtesy Thanksgiving Farm Web Site)


Thanksgiving Farm Winery
(Photo by Ron Patterson)

In 1996, it was sold to the present owners who have meticulously restored the house and established a vineyard and winery.

Thanksgiving Farm Meritage, their signature wine, won the Bronze Medal at the 2010 Grand Harvest Awards Wine Competition in Sonoma.

Thanksgiving Farm Meritage, their signature wine, won the Bronze Medal at the 2010 Grand Harvest Awards Wine Competition in Sonoma. The farm is protected under a perpetual conservation easement through the Anne Arundel County Agricultural and Woodland Preservation Program.


The farm is protected under a perpetual conservation easement through the Anne Arundel County Agricultural and Woodland Preservation Program.

Above Text from Maryland House and Garden Pilgramage 2011 Tours Web Site
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Our Comments:Thanksgiving Farm and Winery is an excellent preservation of a late nineteenth century Queen Ann home and the farm now includes an award winning vineyard.

The owner, Doug Heimbuch (seen at left with his wife Maureen), was sharing wine tastings in the wine cellar. And yes we did take the opportunity to purchase a bottle for later consumption!

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Built in 1869, Christ Church is one of the finest examples of Gothic Revival architecture in Anne Arundel County.

Its board-and -batten siding, steep-pitched shingled roof, and bell tower evoke the romantic picturesque quality of Gothic Revival architecture.

In the interior, a long, narrow nave lighted by stained-glass lancet windows draws the eye upward to the open, dark wood truss-work of the ceiling.

An earlier church on this site was constructed in 1852 and known as St. James-the-Less. This earlier structure served as a “chapel-of-ease” for St. James’ Parish. By 1862 St. James-the-Less was granted independent status and a new parish was formed: Christ Church.

Christ Episcopal Church
Christ Episcopal Church
(Photo by Ron Patterson)


Christ Episcopal Church
(Photo by Ron Patterson)

It included the northern portion of St. James and the Southern portion of All Hallows parishes, two of the original Anglican parishes established in 1692.

The existing church was built through the beneficence of Eleanor Hall McCaleb Burwell in memory of two of her children. Mrs. Burwell was the great-granddaughter of the Reverend Henry Hall, the first rector of St. James' Parish. Christ Church was placed on the National Register in 1973.

An account of Christ Church would be incomplete without mention of the Churchyard, which frames it on three sides and gives the appearance of a wooded hillside that has been tended with gentle consideration for the purpose it serves. To walk through Christ Church cemetery is to walk through the history of this West River community and the nation.

Near the east window of the church can be seen the graves of Eleanor Hall McCaleb Burwell and her husband, Dr. Burwell. Next to these graves are those of the McCaleb children. The inscription on Eleanor's stone: "I have finished the work thou hast sent me to do."


Above Text from Maryland House and Garden Pilgramage 2011 Tours Web Site
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AND from Christ Church West River Web Site
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Our Comments:Christ Episcopal Church is a well known example of Carpenter Gothic architecture (nineteenth century). Two docents - a Mr. Calhoun inside the church and another volunteer outside whose name we did not get - shared interesting stories about the structure and were obviously very proud to be a part of this church's family.

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This house is a superb example of a large well- proportioned hall-parlor plan house. It is set upon early landscaped terraces, surrounded by grand ancient trees and is breathtaking.

The house is believed to have been built between 1672 and 1683 during the ownership of Richard Arnold, a prominent Quaker in the West River area.

This house is a superb example of a large well- proportioned hall-parlor plan house. It is set upon early landscaped terraces, surrounded by grand ancient trees and is breathtaking.

The house is believed to have been built between 1672 and 1683 during the ownership of Richard Arnold, a prominent Quaker in the West River area.

It was once part of Cumberstone, a large tract of land named for John Cumber, patented in 1658.

In the 1720s, Richard Galloway III and his wife Mary Paca Galloway became owners.

Sudley
Sudley
(Photo by Ron Patterson)

It was inherited by their only daughter Susannah Galloway who married Kensey Johns II. Johns, a prosperous merchant, was owner of a warehouse at Pig Point, a colonial port on the Patuxent River, and a business partner with his wife's cousin, Samuel Galloway III of Tulip Hill.

During the occupancy of their son, John Johns, the interior of the house was altered to feature the "new" Georgian style, c. 1760-70. Two flanking wings were added in the late 18th century. The original roof frame features a principal rafter, clasped-purlin construction, a very rare surviving example of its type. The original walls were clad with riven clapboards, some of which can still be seen within the house. In 2007 the current owners acquired and meticulously restored this architectural treasure.

Above Text from Maryland House and Garden Pilgramage 2011 Tours Web Site
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This house is an artful example of a mid-19th century rural Gothic Revival cottage inspired by architectural pattern books.

Quarter Place - Photo by Ron Patterson
Quarter Place
(Photo by Ron Patterson)

It is the work of William H. Peake, Jr. (1837-1920), a prominent Anne Arundel County house carpenter. Other examples of his work can be found in the nearby village of Owensville and elsewhere.

Character - defining features of Peake's work include the use of scrollwork trim, an idiosyncratic Palladian window, paired chamfered columns with cross - bracing and jig-sawn side brackets supporting the porch. Scrollwork bargeboards highlight the central cross gable.

There is also a whale of a lot of civil war history here with fine battlefield tours. Check out the "Tourism" link below.


Built c. 1860 for Augustus Hall and his wife, Mary Cheston Hall, it has been carefully restored by its current owner. The building has also been known as Moreland House after the 20th-century occupants of the property and as Woodbourne Farm. The current owner's business specializes in historic renovation and restoration.

Above Text from Maryland House and Garden Pilgramage 2011 Tours Web Site
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Our Comments: Quarter Place is another Gothic styled rural Victorian house. It's interesting that this architectural style was so popular in this area of Maryland. The dining room here contains a massive American Renaissance style server that almost touches the twelve foot ceiling!

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The land on which this very old, lovely house stands was purchased in 1676 by Richard Harrison, a wealthy Quaker planter and merchant. Although Richard never lived at Holly Hill, in late 1698 or early 1699 he built a frame one-story-and -loft house with riven clapboard exterior sheathing which forms the east end of the present building.

In 1713 two rooms were added and the north and east side walls were replaced with brick. Samuel Harrison inherited Holly Hill and adjacent tracts in 1717.

Before his death in 1733 he doubled the size of the house by adding a cross-wing.

Holly Hill continued in the Harrison family until 1850. Then it was home to a branch of the Scrivner family.It was purchased in 1936 by Captain and Mrs. Hugh LeClair who restored the house, adding a kitchen wing and garage.

The Clagett family, descendants of Richard Harrison, purchased the property in 1968.


Holly Hill
(Photo by Ron Patterson)

Of architectural interest are the massive chimneys, the ogee arches over several windows, and the entrances to barrel- vaulted cellars. Inside, note the huge fireplaces, original floors and paneling, 17th century beams, windowpanes with scratched autographs of 18th and 19th century owners and guests, glimpses of the original clapboard exterior of the 17th century wing, and the interesting main staircase. One second -story room has a wall whose paneling is completely marbleized. There are extensive gardens and landscaped grounds.

Above Text from Maryland House and Garden Pilgramage 2011 Tours Web Site
For More, Click Here

Our Comments: Holly Hill is just a delight - from its well preserved architecture to its delightful Colonial Revival garden overflowing with heirloom plants. The over mantle paintings (4 in all) are an amazing survival of the eighteenth century.

The library (presided over by owner Ms. Booke Glagett on Saturday) could be taken directly from an English country estate. It is a place of portraits, books, research - all with that someone lives here look. The remainder of the house contains wonderful art - from family portraits to modern paintings - historic furniture and collections of every kind. A second floor chamber contains the original marbleized paneling - an amazing reminder of quality of construction and decoration of this house.

It all works to create a layered look of a well lived in (and loved) home.

Please take the time to CHECK OUT THE EARLY PHOTOS of Holly Hill
By Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer May 6, 1937
(Exterior and Interior Images - Examples Below)

Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record

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In 1692, Sir Lionel Copely, Royal Governor of Maryland, instructed the Maryland Assembly to pass the Act of Establishment, dividing the Province of Maryland into 30 Anglican parishes.


St. James Episcopal Church
(Photo by Ron Patterson)

One of these, known as Herring Creeke Parish, was then named St. James' Parish.

The Reverend Henry Hall was appointed the first rector of the Parish in 1698. There are still direct descendants of Mr. Hall who are presently members of the Parish.

In 1763, this church building, no longer being adequate, was replaced with the present building in use today.

The Reverend Thomas John Claggett, rector from 1786-1793, was elected the first Bishop of Maryland and was the first bishop to be consecrated on American soil.

The present rector of St. James' is a direct descendant of Bishop Claggett. Vestry records are complete from 1692 to the present.

The oldest gravestones in the State of Maryland are in the churchyard. The first parochial lending library for the American Parishes of the Church of England was established at St. James' in 1698 and remains open today. The church retains 53 acres of the original glebe of 100 acres deeded to the Parish in 1700. St. James' was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

Above Text from Maryland House and Garden Pilgramage 2011 Tours Web Site
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Our Comments:St. James Episcopal Church dates to the eighteenth century and retains many colonial features. A magnificent colonial communion service was on display here. And the members of this church know how to put on a great "church supper"!

Having read in the tour book that the Women of St. James' Parish were serving their Annual Spring Dinner from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. in the Parish Hall, we made certain we got there in plenty of time.

This convenience was, according to the Tour book, for "Pilgrims who do not wish to return home and cook after a wonderful day of touring."

The menu included crab cakes (absolutely fabulous), country ham (a treat we seldom have), honey-baked ham, scalloped potatoes (just simple perfect), slaw, string beans (prepared as "greasy beans" in the words of my favorite cousin), and rolls.

The cost of a dinner was $20 and a bargain in anyone's lexicon.

We now understand why it is said that "St. James' is widely known for serving delicious dinners and welcome all who wish to partake." So very true.


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This site, named for its location on the Patuxent River, is currently being excavated by archaeologists with Anne Arundel County's Lost Towns Project.


Pig Point Archaeological Site
(Photo by Ron Patterson)

This Native American site has revealed evidence of oval "wigwams" or "yeehawkawns" that are the oldest habitation structures yet found in the Chesapeake region.

It is also proving to be one of Maryland's most deeply stratified archaeological sites, covering 10,000 years of human occupation.

In addition to the remarkable discovery of a series of wigwam structures superimposed on each other, the excavations have unearthed the earliest known triangular projectile points and unusual decorated pottery.

Other exotic finds include a rolled copper bead, a stone platform pipe, marginella beads, New York green jasper, a jasper prismatic blade, and an Ohio Flint Ridge chalcedony Hopewell point.

The geographical sources of these objects suggest that Pig Point was an important trade nexus in prehistoric times. The active archaeological site was accessible for the tour, along with a wigwam, reconstructed by the current owner.

Above Text from Maryland House and Garden Pilgramage 2011 Tours Web Site
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Our Comments:Pig Point Archeological Site was the oldest site on the tour. Owner William Brown III and site workers explained the importance of this developing site and its contributions to our knowledge of life in Southern Maryland before the European arrival.

Last year’s season at Pig Point produced an impressively deep stratigraphic column. Based on artifact styles, these superimposed layers could be seen as representing over 9,000 years of human occupation.
- Lost Towns Project Newsletter - Winter 2011

The dig has uncovered traces of oval Algonquian wigwams; rare tools of stone, bone and antler; fragments of a highly decorated pot; an intact paint pot; and a broken gorget, a dark stone polished and drilled for use as personal decoration.

Carbon 14 dating on charcoal from a hearth found outside the outline of the wigwam suggests that the site was occupied between 1290 and 1300, making it the oldest dwelling ever discovered in the state.

Pig Point Photos by Ron Patterson

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CARS, CARS, CARS - GREAT CARS!!!

During our dinner, we were privileged to sit directly across from a delightful fellow who was obviously an antique car expert. He regaled the table with stories of automobile performance and his driving experiences. We were very interested in the subject, especially since my favorite cousin Mickey Seagle of Pulaski, Virginia, recently donated a 1936 Siebert Ford Combination Ambulance/Hearse to the Virginia Museum of Transportation in Roanoke, Virginia.

And, parked outside the Church were a whole bunch of old cars. My camera was so very, very pleased (See Below)!!!


Antique Automobile Photos by Ron Patterson

Our Comments:This was a wonderful day in the country exploring parts of Maryland with which we were not familiar. The houses and gardens evoke an age and hospitality and way of life fast slipping away from the modern world.